King's CrossAn extraordinary piece of London

 
 

Sustainable living

The homes at King's Cross are sustainable by design

The homes at King’s Cross are designed to have a minimal impact on the environment. The buildings are orientated to take in the views, but not too much direct sunlight. They are built with dense materials that keep things cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Rubbish and recycling have been carefully considered and all the heating and hot water comes from the on-site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant.

Each home will meet the Code for Sustainable Homes rating of four or higher.

Launch event for the Energy Centre at King's Cross

How are the buildings heated?

Each new building connects to the Energy Centre through the district heating network. The centre provides power and generates heat via Combined Heat and Power (CHP) engines. This is a very efficient way to heat the buildings and it  should mean lower energy bills for residents. The centre provides close to 100% of the development’s heat and hot water needs. Learn more about the King’s Cross Energy Centre.

A member of the Estates Management Team removing a full waste bag from a litter bin on the canal tow path, King's Cross

Where does the waste go?

At King’s Cross, we aim to send zero waste to landfill. In 2014/15 we manage achieved this goal for public waste! Our waste from public areas and the buildings is channelled through three streams – direct recycling, food waste and mixed waste which goes to incineration for energy.

Our non-recyclable waste goes to a Veolia Energy Recovery Facility (ERF) in Deptford
Our mixed recycling goes to a Veolia Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) in Southwark
Our food waste is handled by Bio Collectors in Sutton.

In 2014/15 over 90% of construction waste was diverted from landfill. We’re hoping to up this rate next year through clear waste segregation practices and tool-box talks to employees.

Parking for bicycles on King's Boulevard, King's CrossA place for people, not cars

While there is provision for car parking at King’s Cross, the feeling you get here is most definitely car-free. The streets and public spaces give priority to pedestrians and bikes, not cars. But that doesn’t mean that it’s hard to reach. With six underground lines, two mainline stations and 12 bus routes, it’s easy to get where you want to go. There are over 700 public cycle spaces. Find out more about cycle-friendly King’s Cross.

What is the code for sustainable homes?

This is the national standard for the sustainable design and construction of new homes. It aims to reduce carbon emissions and promote higher standards of sustainable design above the current minimum standards set out by the building regulations. The code uses a one to six star system to rate the performance of a new home against these 9 categories:
• energy/CO2
• water
• materials
• surface water runoff (flooding and flood prevention)
• waste
• pollution
• health and well-being
• management
• ecology

Register your interest

Apartments are available now, and new releases are planned for the near future.

Click here to register your interest.

Contact

For more information please contact:

KING’S CROSS RESIDENTIAL MARKETING SUITE
Camilla Veillard-Thomas
Flora Whitehouse

14 – 15 Stable Street
King’s Cross
London
N1C 4AB
T: 0203 691 3969

Email us

Alternatively you can contact our Agents:

KNIGHT FRANK LLP
Priya Pannu

T: 0207 629 8171

Sustainability

To find out more about energy and sustainability at King’s Cross please contact Lydia Dutton

Quotes

“Craftsmanship is very much central to this building and indeed, in the other buildings at King’s Cross. You really get a sense that people spend a long time thinking about how the details work, the way the materials are put together – I think that craftsmanship is really important.”Niall McLaughlin
“If I had to encapsulate our ambition for the interiors of Tapestry in a few words, I would probably pick considered, liveable, effortless.”Fiona Naylor
“One of the things we wanted to build into the garden was the feeling that it was somewhere permanent and somewhere that had a life in it, that was also timeless.”
Dan Pearson